Today was muddy again so I decided to tackle an engine problem instead of working on the inside removal.

The engine run pretty well but after 27 years there is some serious need of a “proper” maintenance. The major problem I got, is the very old radiator. It does leak and even if it could easily been repair, it does have salt corrosions, so I want to put a new one on and try to get another 27 years out of. Paying $600-700 dollars to repair something so old, it doesn’t make any sense. Same rule apply to the radiator hoses and expansion tank. New ones will give me a peace of mind that the cooling system has been taking care of.

To get to the radiator we must first remove the intercooler…

The intercooler is still in very good condition (aluminium cast)and therefore it will get just a good clean.

Is that rust?  😮 Luckily it is just a cheap panel that was supposed to cover the previous rusted hole. Again, a monkey job because replacing the panel it is so much easier and it give you the change to clean the frame behind. Some people should simply not been allowed to work on public transport! The reason why these panel do rust frequently is because they are getting hit by all the stuff that the rear tyres collect from the ground, including small rocks. A more suitable job would be to replace the entire panel and then paint the other side, (the one facing the wheels) with some good bitumen based paint like Ormonoid or Septone. They are virtually the same thing. Ormonoid is probably a fraction thicker and Septone is definitely cheaper. Or you could go the full Monte and apply a coat of Fishoilene first then once dried apply a coat or two of Setpone.

I just open the inspection window and I may have to replace the throttle cable as well. not a big deal as the plan was to replace it with a fly by wire anyway…

The intercooler is out. Now after a sandwich for lunch, we’ll tackle the actual radiator…

Thanks God the four big bolts that hold the radiator in place were pretty easy to remove. What I didn’t expect (or more correctly remember) is that old radiators are very heavy. Even empty, this one felt nearly 100kg and you do need to lift it up to get out of the frame…  After getting stuck twice and some severe painful swearing & crying, it finally managed to come out…

Now we have plenty of room to actual visually inspect this side of the engine and all cables and connections…

While looking around I did find another problem.   😂

Can you see what’s wrong with this picture?
Bad enough that one of the pulley has a chip (not a major problem), but the tension adjustment bolt is completely snap and only the portion of the thread is left. A new bolt is need it and luckily the coach is in metric… Oh dear… It is getting better by the minute…