After having purchased a standard toilet for my motorhome, I came across several articles and videos or people suggesting that a composite toilet it’s a better choice for an RV because of the water saving..

Personally I don’t think the water saving is the end of the story and you may want to watch the video below, as it clearly show and explain the other side of the coin that’s not often mentioned by the people that do sell composite toilets…

There are other situations, not mentioned on this video or most of all the other video found online..

Firstly I noticed that none of the videos available are made by aged or pensioner people, and yet they, sorry we, seem to make the bulk of the nomad on the road.. Coincidence?? I really don’t think so.. I mean, a composite toilet seem like a lots of work to me and my Dometic only uses a couple of litre per flush..

I only need to look for a dumping station and spend five minutes once a month, instead of every three days walking on the street with a huge jug of smelling urea..

Frankly, I’m afraid to think what could happen if one night after a bottle of two of Chateau Petrus, I wake up in the middle of a cold winter night and feel the urge for one of those call of nature where you know that you are in trouble, because an explosion is about to happen…

Pardon my French, but how do you train your ass to aim? 8-).. Ever tried to fill a water bottle with a sprinkler? 8-)

Also what do you do if you get a stomach bug and you need to throw up?..

Those situations don’t happen often, but none the less they do happen.. The last thing I need on a night like that, is having to worry to open the compost toilet and deal with the liquids that have logically felt in the larger hole..

I was reading the other day the editorial of Caravan Camping Sales HERE where they tested the two most popular brand, but I can’t help to see few contradictions..

So, we start with this:

Until recently, the dump point ritual was as much a part of our motorhome adventures as the distinct aroma of a full RV toilet during summer…. but not anymore! Enter the composting toilet.

But then…

This liquid can be poured into any available toilet or diluted and safely tipped onto a handy lemon tree or some other shrubbery.

I don’t see very often Lemon tree on the side of the road, and ok, an “available toilet” is easier to find than the dumping point, but you still need a dumping location none the less…

Now regarding water usage:

The first is the composting system uses no water. The second is the ‘poo’ is separated from the ‘wee’, which offers all kinds of advantages when it comes time for disposal.

So the composting use no water what so ever. Remember that!

I have no idea of which kinds of advantages he’s referring too, but lets keep reading…

Of course the real boon of the composting toilet is that it uses no water, apart from some minimal spray-rinsing of the bowl after use.

Spray?? Rinsing of the bowl?? With what??

I really like this bit here…

Until recently, the dump point ritual was as much a part of our motorhome adventures as the distinct aroma of a full RV toilet during summer…. but not anymore! Enter the composting toilet.

Then right at the end..

Admittedly, a family of four using the composting toilet full time doesn’t allow the matter sufficient time to break down properly before the system gets full but even so, the odour is surprisingly negligible.

If you compare a composite toilet to a 20 litres cassette toilet, I can see some differences, but not real massive advantages…

Honestly, kinda feel glad I went for a standard toilet system…  :D