Back in August I mentioned purchasing a Bricor “Navy shower head” for Gigi. You may wonder why it’s called the Navy shower head and the reason behind is quite simple..

There is only that much water a submarine or boat can carry, therefore like an RV it is imperative to have a shower head where you can still clean yourself by using the least amount of water as possible.

The US company Bricor has been selling these kinds of shower head for years and I can confirm that they are made of an excellent quality. Their Patented design 8,991,419 was just recently awarded to them for their latest Venturi design system that it is incorporated in the UltraMax Ultra Low Flow Shower Head. A quick look at their website does also show several models and variants of shower head, so you should be able to pick the best solution for your situation..

The unit is quite expensive but there is no cheap plastic here and if used in clean water, it will last for decades. They are available either in Australia HERE or directly from the company in the US that also do take Paypal.  As usual, the Australian site does charge nearly double the original cost but this has become old news now..

When you purchase the shower head form US, you are asked to enter your current water pressure. This is important for the Venturi to work as intended. If you don’t know your vehicle pressure they will send you a head unit set to 50 PSI, that it’s ok for most situation anyway. In my case I run the entire vehicle at 40 PSI, therefore I did let them know of my different pressure setting.

The first obvious test I did once the shower head was replaced with the UltraMax, was to check the actual amount of water coming out per minute. The company state the unit at 0.625 GPM (2.366 Litres Per Minute) and again I can confirm that at 40 PSI that figure is quite accurate..

Above is a 3 Litres container and you can see that after a minute, the level is just below half the container. That to me is a pretty good exact and “precise” analysis 😁.

Ok I didn’t have a graduate container handy, but that plastic container does give me an idea of how much little water this shower head does use. According to statistic, the average shower does last around 8.3 minutes.

Let’s do some maths:

Conventional shower head (average) 4.5 to 6 litres per minute. Above shower would be between 37 and 50 litres per shower.

With the UltraMax shower head you will use only 19 litres for the same length shower of 8.3 minutes.

To make it look even better lets multiply those figure for an average of 30 showers per month..

Conventional 1305 litres per month.. UltraMax  570 litres per month.. In my case (4 minute shower) is actually only 283 litres per month

Converting these figure in real life and based on my tank size, it means that I can shower for either 16 weeks with the UltraMax or nearly 4 weeks with the conventional shower head.

Practically in just 4 months the shower head just pays for itself, if you consider the cost in driving around just to refill the water tanks. Then off course you need to consider the size of the grey water tank as well. More trips to the dumping points..

The shower head also do come with a rotary little knob/lever where you can constantly adjust the amount of Venturi (air in the water) and simultaneously the width of the spray pattern (not by much).

Now, my recommendation for this type of shower head, is to be mounted on a hose setup and not fixed to the wall, because realistically 2.5 litres are not that much and it can take a while to get all the soap off your body, so having the head attached to the hose does help a lot and it saves time and water again. It is also imperative that you use clean water as the jets in the head are nearly microscopic, and I think with heavy or bore water, the head would fail very quickly..

I would also suggest keeping the old shower head for when camping and connected to the main town pressure, or for when using heavy water, so that you can really have the best of both world.

Do I recommend it? Definitely, especially considering the current Australia wide water restrictions in place.

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